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The Tailor and Cutter and London Art Journal: An Index of Cutting, Fashion and Trade, 1890


Another tailoring book, but totally packed with diagrams of fantastic quality.






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Ladies cutting made easy, 1885


Beautiful plates, including braid layouts.






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The Weekly record of fashion, 1882


Beautiful plates.



The Monthly record of fashion, volume 7 1883


The Monthly record of fashion, volume 8 1883


The Monthly record of fashion, volume 9 1884


 


 





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Cutting Out and Dressmaking, 1879


And yet another drafting manual being slightly old fashioned.






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The Art of Dressmaking, 1895


What a clever and distinct publication! The garments are photographed and are clearly scale miniatures.






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The Complete Dressmaker for the Million, 1875


Once again very old fashioned shapes for the era.






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A Concise Treatise on Ladies and Misses’ Tight-fitting Garments, 1886


And the tradition of drafting books appearing several years older than pattern sketches.


However this is great as this book deals with basically natural form shapes!






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MYRA’S THREEPENNY JOURNAL (1882)


I had only read of this by the term “Myra’s” so finding a copy at all has been fun. This again mainly has plates with front and back views but a few plates stand out, again I love the use of folds and pleats 😉


 





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The World of fashion and continental feuilletons (1879-1880)



I have seen this in Patterns of Fashion 2 for years so it’s nice to be able to put it in context!


There is also a skirt pattern that shows the top and tailing cutting layout but also the curved upper section for fitting over the hips!



And this section is repeated a few times, handy for those who were collecting the magazines by month!



Plate 178 has a style I love, the self trimmed gown, the vertical folds at the neck.



Maybe I can do this with my princesse petticoat? It would make it so very much more useful!



There are other columes online too!






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oh no!

Mar. 27th, 2017 02:12 am
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I still believe one of my beaded skirt obsessions was from a tiny book on costume, probably wedding dresses and is almost certainly gone (the library probably has removed the book from even stack.)


But I think I may also have totally forgotten that one of my favourite costumes from film has a very heavily pearled tablier!


http://www.wornthrough.com/2014/02/museum-life-film-costume-in-the-gallery-and-the-archive/



and:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/bauhausfrau/albums/72157632918697746




In fact this so closely matches my image in my head that perhaps I was thinking of it all along!


Though the company that created the gown is very well known for using historic sources so there may also be some influence of the same sources!





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Sylvia’s Home Journal, 1879


The full pattern is not available, but it is interesting to see the difference in how ready made patterns are drawn at this time compared to how drafting blocks are drawn.


Drafting blocks are generally still very heavily 1860s in shape whiles these pattern sketches tend to show the very long line of the era.






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How to dress well on a shilling a day: a ladies’guide to home dressmaking and millinery.


 


Highly recommended for the text as it describes the order of sewing and how to. That paragraph on the “bulgarian fold” is really amazing! At least for coming out and stating that the “peacock” style train is impossible to self arrange! Which is something I have trying to get across when getting photos of my gowns with trains- they need a wrangler to look good!





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View in Instagram





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I fitted such an extreme shape by using grain changes. I started by making the fit from bust point to shoulder and armscye smooth first.


View in Instagram





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http://www.arrayedindreams.com/tag/sunburst/


I don’t know if I grabbed all my lj posts- can only really grab tagged posts. But okay, now I remember why I kept stalling. And stalling, and stalling.


But this week has seen other projects able to be passed on and so a lot of reshuffling of my Must Make projects.


And I never have stopped obsessing over this thing. It started in my teens, it was one of the very first historic garments that grabbed me by the ears and shouted “this is art!” long before i found it recognised as such (any art courses dealt with fashion theory, not clothing as technical and artistic in and of itself.. textiles were seen as art, not cutting.)


 


Beaded tablier are an obsession so there will be a post about them at some point.





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I try to not be around people (online or off) when I am this tired, and now I have a lovely reminder why- I simply can’t communicate properly. And on the other hand when I am this tired my eyes tend to go dead and I look furious. Actually I look in pain but it is usually read as furious (in the same way a grimace can be mistaken for a smile.)


So it’s just not good or helpful.


But I’m starting to see a pattern to how this tends to lead up to weekends being tiring right now and that’s everything to do with how exhausting travelling alone is. JUst across the city, but with the products I want to buy it winds up using a lot of energy.


So come the weekend I am too tired.


So given there are some events coming up I need to be careful for I will be avoiding all solo travel for a while 🙂





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Sierra Boggess shared this image yesterday and can you see what has made me so excited? The fabric is thin. Well fairly thin- the flash and angle allows us to see her skin across the arm while the fabric looks more opaque closer to the armscye (where the fabric turns and follows the curve of her shoulder.) The sleeves are either unlined or lined with something very fine while the bodice is flat lined in a solid white.


I tend to double line my bodices and either not line or line my sleeves in a very thin material too.


Also if you follow the lines of the fabric on her sleeve you can see how very shallow the sleeve head is. This is both era appropriate and theatre appropriate as it means you can get your arms over your head. Notice the small wrinkles between shoulder and armscye? Yep. Modern patterns try to eliminate that by using a very tall sleeve head and that is what gives us limited arm range.


The effort to make a garment look good on the stand makes for a garment that is far less practical.


Anyway, just my thought process when I look at new/different images of the same garment 🙂 It’s all about the fit.


 


Oh and there is probably a bit of ease in the top of the sleeve head, I use three rows of stitches to do this rather than two as it does makes the fine gathers almost invisible.





Happy birthday to @andrewlloydwebber!!!!! So grateful you are on this planet!!!


A post shared by Sierra Boggess (@officialsierraboggess) on





 





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http://www.barnesnz.co.nz/


Henderson Auckland!!!


!!!!!!! I can’t really justify 27kg of the stuff but they have the S foam 130 flex!


http://www.barnesnz.co.nz/polyurethane/s-foam-130-flex-foam-1392


This is what I used for my super squishy and very flexible Togruta headpieces 🙂


It’s a bit tricky when you don’t have a perfect mold that includes headcast but this time I do sort of! This will make the foam fill in the space perfectly 🙂 I can keep my molds!!!


 


Also this is not what I used but could be ideal for paint:


http://www.barnesnz.co.nz/polyurethane/sc92-single-component-coating-1291





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I am ready to wear the daggy clothing with all the latex marks today, also to then work on my Cleves frock indoors, or tool the rest of Ahsoka’s armour. Whichever second activity is chosen will be down to working in the room or away from any potential to bump into the latex.


Yes I have done so.


Yes you can readily see this effect on the carpet out there.


They are carpet tiles. Well continuous lengths but the same stuff. So… will try to avoid any slumping anyway and also to cunningly cut the foam to allow for easy fitting once made up.





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(it is a happy post, honest!) Managed to go through all my paperwork. Found all the shows I had been in. All the travel documents. What the heck-most was from before I was 25.

I was working full time, doing theatre, training at the gym (a spot of stunt training too), doing charity, and travelling.


I know it is not related. It was a mix of dumb luck (a viral infection and an injury at the same time confused my immune system) but there is also a bit of genetic predisposition.



I get sad when I think of opportunities I could have created or am no longer able to commit to. But holy wow that was a lot of reminiscing and remembering how brave I was. Still am. It’s just the real limits have shifted. So it doesn’t look or feel like it.


But that is not the same as bitter, or resentful. It is here, it is now.


And I am grateful for every single opportunity I did have- taken or not.






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